Boats insure against collision with Loch Ness Monster

These uninsured sailors braved the risk of collision with Nessie
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Prudent cruising sailors might insure against collision with a whale in the ocean, but the owner of some boats that sail on Loch Ness is so worried about the reappearance of 'Nessie', the Loch Ness Monster, that she's taken out insurance against their boats being damaged by Nessie next time she surfaces.

Jacobite Cruises, based in Inverness, has taken a £1million insurance against colliding with the monster. For Freda Newton, owner of the cruise boats, it's perfectly logical. ‘How silly would we look if it did and we weren't covered for it? I hope we never have to make a claim and if Nessie does make another appearance, she gives our boats a wide berth.’

'We'd look a bit silly if we hadn't insured' - owner of cruise boats
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The cover was taken with insurance firm Towergate Moray Firth. Director of the firm, Bob Jack said: ‘This is probably the most unusual insurance request we have ever had, but we are delighted to provide cover.

‘I'm sure everyone who sets sail on the loch would settle for a sighting of Nessie rather than a much closer encounter. We wish Jacobite, their passengers and crews many more happy voyages on the loch without any claims on this policy.’

A famous early sighting
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Freda owns three vessels and carries around 10,000 sightseers each year on Loch Ness. The insurance policy comes on the 80th anniversary of the first Nessie sighting.

The first modern sighting of the monster was by Aldie Mackay, manager of the Drumnadrochit Hotel in Inverness. Her account was reported in a local newspaper on March 14, 1933.

Nessie has been the subject of many sightings. Some experts believe that the beast represents a line of long-surviving plesiosaurs, a type of carnivorous aquatic reptile from millions of years ago.

The creature is similar to other supposed lake monsters, though its description varies from one account to the next, and there have been hundreds of supposed sightings over the years.

One of the most accepted explanations is that the monster is in fact a giant sturgeon, which can grow up to 12ft long. Other theories include eels, bird wakes, seals, trees, logs, submarines and dogs.