Product of the Week: Clean, safe, dehumidifier

Air-Dryr dehumidifier
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Whether you leave your boat unattended in the berth of a marina for lengthy periods of time or not, it's difficult to keep the dampness of the sea air from causing mildew, mould and corrosion, particularly in closed areas.

Yet some dehumidifiers have been proved to be dangerous in that they can cause fire (See http://www.sail-world.com/CruisingAus/Dehumidifier-Danger:--Dont-let-this-happen-to-you/79155!our_recent_story).

There is a simple solution, called Air-Dryr, our Product of the Week:


Because the clever unit uses heat and natural convection to warm and dry the air, mold and corrosion simply have no moisture to work with. However, the product has no components to cause sparking, so the traditional fear of fire is eliminated, and there are no unsightly dehumidifying bags or fan units requiring drainage or frequent emptying

The product is designed for constant use, and fits out of the way in an enclosed space and plugs into a power source. It dries damp air by heating it above dew point, then releasing warmed air through top vents.

Better still, with no switch, fan or thermostat, the silent Air-Dryr is trouble-free and draws no more energy than a light bulb. A thermal cut-off shuts down the unit should air flow be impeded.

You'll find it useful in cabins, v-berths and engine rooms. It will keep the air fresh, prevent condensation and protect any precious woodwork on your boat.

Technical Specifications:
The unit is made of durable polycarbonate and there are different sizes available:

The Air-Dryr 500 from Davis Instruments handles up to 14 cu. m, draws only 0.6 amps, 70W, and measures 36cm L x 13cm W x 11cm H, and costs around $60, not including mail costs.

The Air-Dryr 1000 handles 28 cu. m, draws 1.1 amps, 130W, and measures 34cm in diameter and 11cm high and costs around $70 not including mailing.

The basic units operate on 110/120V. For use in countries which have 220-260 volts, both models come in CE-certified 220-260V configurations.

Use underway, on a mooring or at anchor:
In its present form, the Air Dryr is not suitable for yachts when not connected to shore power, as it requires 110/240 volts. While the manufacturers have not advised this, or even mentioned it, a short calculation tells you that the smaller system will use around 50 amps a day. If you have good solar power on your boat (and reliable sun), then by use of a small inverter, of which there are many on the market (http://www.amazon.com/Inverter-Vehicle-Adaptor-Electric-Equipments/dp/B003XDZD6W/ref=pd_sbs_ol_2!for-instance), you could connect the Air-Dryr to your 12 volt system, and the boat will remain damp free and sweet smelling constantly! I haven't tried this, and would be interested in hearing from anyone who has.
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